Facebook Twitter Gplus YouTube E-mail RSS
Home News Silicon Knights Working On Highly Requested IP

Silicon Knights Working On Highly Requested IP

Published on March 25, 2012 by

Games designer and founder of Silicon Knights Denis Dyack revealed an interesting piece of information on the company’s next project during an interview.

When speaking with GamesIndustry International Dyack hinted, “We’re really excited and we’re working on our next generation stuff. We’re working on an IP that’s our most requested and we’re really excited about that.”

Silicon Knights are perhaps remembered most for their unique horror Eternal Darkness on the Nintendo Gamecube which received high praise from both critics and gamers alike. Unfortunately though we were only treated to the one. Previous interviews with the company have always seen questions asked about the future of the franchise with fans looking for any signs of a potential sequel, so it wouldn’t be surprising if this is the highly requested IP.

Maybe we could be seeing a sequel on the Wii U?

Eternal Darkness was a true highlight for the Gamecube

Unfortunately Dyack is not ready to discuss any further details, “We’re smaller, obviously,” he said referring to layoffs, “and we’re going back to our roots. I’m really looking forward to a point in time when we can talk about it, it’s just not today. That’s the current state of things. I think the state of our demise has been greatly exaggerated. Here we are. We’re here.”

Hopefully we’ll see some new information at E3.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
No Comments  comments 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

* Copy this password:

* Type or paste password here:

93,658 Spam Comments Blocked so far by Spam Free Wordpress

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

© Fancensus
credit